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Tutoni's menu of creative dishes and new spins on traditional Italian standards offers customers a dining experience they can’t find anywhere else. We’re "taking it back to the old country" by providing authentic Italian flavors. We take pride in working with local farms and farmers: each seasonal menu emphasizes the best of the region’s abundant agricultural scene. At Tutoni's, seasonal makes sense and people are priority.

In The News

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York restaurant community seeks help for beloved Tutoni's bartender facing dire diagnosis

It was 2:30 in the morning. He'd been bed-ridden by a bout of pneumonia that forced him into a dreaded hospital visit. After hours of blood tests, CT scans and MRIs, the doctors landed a haymaker on his psyche.  They had discovered a 2-centimeter tumor in the 50-year-old man's chest, dangerously close to a lymph node.  "I told them I had to go home and do my wine and alcohol order," Tutoni's bartender James Gibble said when told he had Stage 1 lung cancer.  But Gibble would spend an entire week in the hospital, undergoing more tests before breaking the news to family and friends via Facebook.  "I felt like I needed to let people know I was OK," he said.  Gibble admits he doesn't like to complain and is not a very public person. On Tuesday, two days after his release from the hospital, Gibble sat in the middle of Tutoni's dining room and shared his story. After each question, his eyes glanced downward, his newsboy cap dipping just a little lower. He was slow to answer, uncertain of how to deal with this freight train bearing down on him; of how to properly share the weight of life-changing news and a potential life-changing response.

It was 2:30 in the morning. He'd been bed-ridden by a bout of pneumonia that forced him into a dreaded hospital visit. After hours of blood tests, CT scans and MRIs, the doctors landed a haymaker on his psyche.

They had discovered a 2-centimeter tumor in the 50-year-old man's chest, dangerously close to a lymph node.

"I told them I had to go home and do my wine and alcohol order," Tutoni's bartender James Gibble said when told he had Stage 1 lung cancer.

But Gibble would spend an entire week in the hospital, undergoing more tests before breaking the news to family and friends via Facebook.

"I felt like I needed to let people know I was OK," he said.

Gibble admits he doesn't like to complain and is not a very public person. On Tuesday, two days after his release from the hospital, Gibble sat in the middle of Tutoni's dining room and shared his story. After each question, his eyes glanced downward, his newsboy cap dipping just a little lower. He was slow to answer, uncertain of how to deal with this freight train bearing down on him; of how to properly share the weight of life-changing news and a potential life-changing response.

 
Live television isn’t easy – ask anyone who’s ever even attempted a Facebook Live, or just tried recording themselves – things can get awkward in a hurry.  That happened recently in a central Pennsylvania news segment, and, what's worse, that segment is getting national attention.  It starts with Fox 43’s Matt Maisel beginning to introduce reporter Chris Garrett, who was “wining and dining” at Tutoni’s in York during Restaurant Week.  Maisel then asks Garrett, “I got to ask you, are you a white guy or a red guy” – referring to his wine preference.  Garrett, a black man, hesitates for a moment, shakes it off and says that he is a “white guy” as Tutoni’s co-owner Toni Calderone begins to laugh.  Then, Garrett doubles down, saying he “likes reds too, so I guess you can say I go both ways.”

Live television isn’t easy – ask anyone who’s ever even attempted a Facebook Live, or just tried recording themselves – things can get awkward in a hurry.

That happened recently in a central Pennsylvania news segment, and, what's worse, that segment is getting national attention.

It starts with Fox 43’s Matt Maisel beginning to introduce reporter Chris Garrett, who was “wining and dining” at Tutoni’s in York during Restaurant Week.

Maisel then asks Garrett, “I got to ask you, are you a white guy or a red guy” – referring to his wine preference.

Garrett, a black man, hesitates for a moment, shakes it off and says that he is a “white guy” as Tutoni’s co-owner Toni Calderone begins to laugh.

Then, Garrett doubles down, saying he “likes reds too, so I guess you can say I go both ways.”

 
 
The vision of York’s nightlife scene can be (fairly or unfairly) stereotyped as a laid-back craft brewery or a local watering hole, but in the few months since it opened, the King George Club has bucked that trend.  “We blew that stigma out of the water,” King George co-owner Toni Calderone said.  Calderone opened the King George —  a chic, 30-seat speakeasy with Prohibition-era decor  — in the basement of Tutoni’s Restaurant in York in November. Although the club has been exposed to the public since doors opened, the establishment has been selling memberships before it transitions to a members-only club starting March 1.  When the club’s opening was announced, it was met with some excitement, but also some negative feedback suggesting the club wouldn’t work in York’s nightlife scene. Comments on the York Daily Record’s Facebook page included “don’t know if that is a good idea” and “set sail to fail.”

The vision of York’s nightlife scene can be (fairly or unfairly) stereotyped as a laid-back craft brewery or a local watering hole, but in the few months since it opened, the King George Club has bucked that trend.

“We blew that stigma out of the water,” King George co-owner Toni Calderone said.

Calderone opened the King George — a chic, 30-seat speakeasy with Prohibition-era decor — in the basement of Tutoni’s Restaurant in York in November. Although the club has been exposed to the public since doors opened, the establishment has been selling memberships before it transitions to a members-only club starting March 1.

When the club’s opening was announced, it was met with some excitement, but also some negative feedback suggesting the club wouldn’t work in York’s nightlife scene. Comments on the York Daily Record’s Facebook page included “don’t know if that is a good idea” and “set sail to fail.”

 

Tutoni's in York to Open Self-Serve Wine Bar

Tutoni's Restaurant prepares for York Restaurant Week. Bonnie Arbittier photo (Bonnie Arbittier)

Tutoni's Restaurant prepares for York Restaurant Week. Bonnie Arbittier photo (Bonnie Arbittier)


Wine glasses are set at tables at Tutoni's in York Tuesday, June 9, 2015. Tutoni's is currently a BYOB establishment, however legislation is heading to the state house that would lower the ratio of food to liquor from 70/30 percent to 50/50 percent for a special, cheaper liquor license. Kate Penn — Daily Record/Sunday News (Kate Penn — Daily Record/Sunday News)

Wine glasses are set at tables at Tutoni's in York Tuesday, June 9, 2015. Tutoni's is currently a BYOB establishment, however legislation is heading to the state house that would lower the ratio of food to liquor from 70/30 percent to 50/50 percent for a special, cheaper liquor license. Kate Penn — Daily Record/Sunday News (Kate Penn — Daily Record/Sunday News)


About 200 people gather in the middle of Beaver Street in York for the Farm to City Street Dinner featuring food freshly harvested from local farms, Sunday October 4, 2015. John A. Pavoncello - jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com

About 200 people gather in the middle of Beaver Street in York for the Farm to City Street Dinner featuring food freshly harvested from local farms, Sunday October 4, 2015. John A. Pavoncello - jpavoncello@yorkdispatch.com



The fruit and cheese board appetizer at Tutoni's

The fruit and cheese board appetizer at Tutoni's

Tutoni's executive chef Scott Robinson rides in the back of a truck to see the pigs he buys for the restaurant at Rettland Farm in Adams County. Even when working at other restaurants, Robinson brought Ramsburg's meat along for the ride, and it's now served in Baltimore restaurants thanks to their connections.

Tutoni's executive chef Scott Robinson rides in the back of a truck to see the pigs he buys for the restaurant at Rettland Farm in Adams County. Even when working at other restaurants, Robinson brought Ramsburg's meat along for the ride, and it's now served in Baltimore restaurants thanks to their connections.


Kellie Wivell, Kelly Stahlman, Mindy Ott, Laci Wildasin, Kara Olewiler and Jessica Daniels begin eating their meal at Tutoni's Restaurant as server Sarah Grim sets down a fresh plate. Tutoni's Restaurant, which serves Mediterranean-inspired food made with locally sourced ingredients, operates on a seasonal menu. (Chris Dunn — FlipSide)

Kellie Wivell, Kelly Stahlman, Mindy Ott, Laci Wildasin, Kara Olewiler and Jessica Daniels begin eating their meal at Tutoni's Restaurant as server Sarah Grim sets down a fresh plate. Tutoni's Restaurant, which serves Mediterranean-inspired food made with locally sourced ingredients, operates on a seasonal menu. (Chris Dunn — FlipSide)


Toni and Tony Calderone, left, with their executive chef Scott Robinson inside the former Colosseo building in the 100 block of North George Street. The group plans to open Tutoni's in the space in April. They are demolishing the first-floor bar to make more space for dining. (DAILY RECORD/SUNDAY NEWS -- Paul Kuehnel)

Toni and Tony Calderone, left, with their executive chef Scott Robinson inside the former Colosseo building in the 100 block of North George Street. The group plans to open Tutoni's in the space in April. They are demolishing the first-floor bar to make more space for dining. (DAILY RECORD/SUNDAY NEWS -- Paul Kuehnel)